Posts Taged time-management

Weekend Love, January Twenty Four

Link loveWe’re going to start posting on the weekends some of the great nuggets we’ve found on the web.  Most will be a handful of links to tools or great content.  Occasionally we’ll include one from my “save” file that hits my mood.

Robert Cialdini’s book, Influence, is considered one of the best in explaining persuasion.  I encountered an infographic that highlights the six means of influence.  It’s true to Cialdini’s style, so if you like the infographic, pick up the book.

I love Ted Talks. I get their newsletter every weekend.  Last week they included a talk from 2011 on lying, spotting lies, and finding truth.  It’s a great 20-minute break.

As a coach, time management insights always pop up on my radar.  An article on HBR looks at some recent research on The Pros and Cons of Doing One Thing at a Time.  My favorite line in the article is “When tasks accumulate at a frantic pace, the multitasking really picks up, requiring a concentration level that can border on the manic.”

Naomi Dunford is a trainer/coach for entrepreneurs and marketers.  She’s also an engaging writer. This week she wrote on Success Generally Happens after This Part.

From the archives:  a year ago, Leo Babuta wrote on Letting Go of Judging People.  I heartily recommended this as a read.  I periodically return to it.

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The Art of Delegation

Coaching delegationMost of us learn delegation through the pain or pleasure process.  You don’t delegate until it becomes some painful that you have to do something.  The good news is that you don’t have to wait that long.  When you set some principles and procedures, you’ll be delegating the right things to the right people at the right time.

Kristi Pavlik, Chief Visionary Officer at Adonai Business Solutions, helps entrepreneurs navigate their business journeys to success. She has been teaching entrepreneurs and small business owners how to transform big ideas into business models that support profit and growth. Active in the business management field for over 20 years, Kristi is a skilled professional who helps entrepreneurs from beginners to business leaders “get out of their own way”. Clients who work with Kristi are amazed at how she can help their business move forward. She can help launch a new business, grow an established business, or explore uncharted territory with industry leaders. Business owners are thrilled at the results on a business and personal level.

Kristi is an expert on delegation.  This is the second of two articles she volunteered to write on delegation for us.  The other one is called Delegate, Delegate, Delegate. You can contact Kristi at kristi.adonai@gmail.com.  Her website will provide more details on how she works. Here are some of Kristi’s insights on the art of delegation.

The Art of Delegation

One of the most important skills a business owner can learn is the art of delegation. Many of us know we need to delegate more, but we hesitate. Why put off something that can help your business run more efficiently and effectively? It can feel overwhelming to try to figure out what and when to delegate, so we avoid it. Assigning tasks and giving ownership of those tasks to trusted associates is one of the wisest and most effective things we can do as entrepreneurs, and we need to learn how.

The basic rule of delegation is simple: If you aren’t good at it, or if it takes your time and energy away from the core of your business, delegate that task.

Every business owner should do this task, so why delegate it? The truth is, every business owner is different, with their own skills and preferences and they don’t do it all. Think about it: Bill Gates does not do his own filing, and you know he doesn’t do Microsoft’s accounts receivables himself! It doesn’t matter if it’s a basic business task, if bookkeeping, email management, or scheduling overwhelms you, or pulls you away from the tasks that make your business run? Delegate it. There’s no award for heroics in business! Forcing yourself to do tasks you’re unsuited for, or that you just plain dislike, doesn’t win a prize. In fact, experience shows us that someone who struggles with or dislikes a task takes longer to do it and makes more errors. Forcing yourself to do them really is a waste of time and money. Imagine the freedom you’ll feel when you can delegate to someone who has expertise and finds enjoyment in those tasks you dread.

It’s easier to just do it myself. This one is an excuse to avoid delegating, it really isn’t easier to do everything ourselves. Once you teach someone how to do the task your way, you’re done. Are you insisting on doing a job that sucks your time away from the real business of your company? Do you wade through hundreds of emails or phone calls each day only to find that your whole morning evaporated and you are constantly playing catch-up? Is basic office management getting in the way of doing business? It’s time to delegate the basic tasks like data entry, phone calls, email, calendars, and even travel arrangements and research. Be honest about what tasks only you can do, and build your job description around those tasks. You’ll be amazed how much you can get done when every task you do is important to your role! The art of delegation is the honest evaluation of every task you do. Should this really be your task? If not, delegate. You are the CEO, and created your business from the ground up. You are needed to do executive tasks, and to work at the core of your company steering and growing it. Focus your time and energy on the tasks that only you can do, and find good associates to accomplish the day-to-day tasks that keep your business organized, updated, and running smoothly. Delegation at its heart is pretty simple: Your company needs you to captain the ship, so put down the oars and hire a sailor who loves to row!

Kristi Pavlik

Adonai Business Solutions, LLC

www.adonai-llc.com

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Delegate, Delegate, Delegate!

Coaching delegationDelegation is one of those topics that frequently comes up in coaching. Since time is a limited resources, coaching clients need to clear some bandwidth to make changes and that usually involves delegating.

At the ICF Convention in Cleveland, I met Kristi Pavlik, Chief Visionary Officer at Adonai Business Solutions, who helps entrepreneurs navigate their business journeys to success.She has been teaching entrepreneurs and small business owners how to transform big ideas into business models that support profit and growth. Active in the business management field for over 20 years, Kristi is a skilled professional who helps entrepreneurs from beginners to business leaders “get out of their own way”. Clients who work with Kristi are amazed at how she can help their business move forward. She can help launch a new business, grow an established business, or explore uncharted territory with industry leaders. Business owners are thrilled at the results on a business and personal level.

Kristi is an expert on delegation, and she volunteered to write a couple of articles on delegation for us.  You can contact Kristi at kristi.adonai@gmail.com.  Her website will provide more details on how she works. Here are some of Kristi’s insights on the art of delegation.

Delegate, Delegate, Delegate!

The art of delegation is important in a heart-based business like coaching and speaking. Many of us even urge our clients to learn to delegate, but we hesitate to put into practice in our own business. Why do we run from it? In a business we built on a passion for helping others, we get trapped in the idea that we should do it all ourselves. Intellectually, we know better: Assigning tasks and giving ownership of those tasks to trusted associates is one of the wisest and most effective things we can do as a business owner.

The basic rule of delegation is simple: If the task something you love to do, that you’re skilled at doing, or that builds your business and spreads your message, you should do it. If it isn’t, delegate it!

This task is essential to my business, so why delegate it? The truth is, every business owner is different, with their own skills and preferences and they don’t do it all. Think about it: Tony Robbins does not do his own filing, and you know Seth Godin answer every email himself! It doesn’t matter if it’s a basic business task, or a crucial task like scheduling or travel booking, if it pulls you away from speaking, writing, or designing your next workshop? Delegate it. There’s no award for heroics in business! Forcing yourself to do tasks you dislike or that don’t suit your skills doesn’t win a prize. In fact, someone who struggles with or dislikes a task takes longer to do it and makes more errors. Forcing yourself to do them is a waste of time, energy, and money. Delegate to someone who has expertise and finds enjoyment in those tasks you dread, and focus your energy on changing lives.

I should be able to do it all. This one is just isn’t true! Are you trying to play superhero because you’re afraid clients will doubt your expertise if you need help in your business? Becoming overworked and overtired doesn’t make you look like SuperCoach, you just look overwhelmed! Do you wade through hundreds of emails or phone calls each day only to find that your whole morning evaporated and you are struggle to find time for your heart-based work? Are basic office tasks getting in the way of  the work you feel so passionately about? You really do need to delegate basic tasks like data entry, phone calls, email, calendars, and even travel arrangements and research. Be honest about your coaching or speaking business and what tasks only you can do, and build your job description around those tasks. You’ll be amazed how far you can spread your message and how many lives you can change when every task you do is important to your role as speaker, coach, and mentor!

The art of delegation in the honest evaluation of every task you do. Should this really be your task? If not, delegate. You are the CEO and a Speaker or Coach, and created your business from a passion for making a difference. You are needed to do executive level business tasks to steer and grow your business, and to spend the majority of your time and energy spreading your message and changing lives for the better. Focus on the tasks that only you can do, and find good associates to accomplish the day-to-day tasks that keep your business organized, updated, and running smoothly. Delegation at its heart is pretty simple: Your company needs you to write, design, and speak your life-changing messages, so delegate those office tasks and put your full energy into changing the world!

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Big Rocks Always Come First

Stephen Covey passed away on Monday, July 16, 2012.  His work on personal leadership and development has an impact that will live on.  His book on The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People is considered one of the most influential books of our times and has been read by over 20 million people.

My first coach training was at a Franklin Covey Coach Training session in Salt Lake City. Over the years, I’ve had the opportunity to rely on material in Covey’s books for training pieces that I’ve done.  One that I truly love is about the Big Rocks.  This is your chance to spend seven minutes with Stephen Covey on a very important lesson.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j6m9WnNdpSw

What’s your favorite piece of knowledge from Covey?

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Finding Balance by Creating Margins

Most of us grew up using margins when we write.  Remember the red line on the left of the paper?  When we use margins, a note is easier to read.  When you write “margin-less”, like the note below, it is difficult to read.


As coaches, we listen for what is said and what is not said.  Often I find my clients are pushing their margins to the edge in their business and life.

What are the signs of a margin-less life? There are different clues for individuals.  One sign for me was when I overslept, was hurrying to get the kids to middle school, ran out of gas, coasted down the hill to the gas station, had the sixth grader drive so I could push the van to the pump and that was a ”normal” day.

Other signs include:  a client has a beautiful home, big screen TV, several cars and yet yearns for time to take a walk.

The client may be headed toward “margin-less” when she finds herself  apologizing for being late for a conference call or appointments that she set up because she was running behind.

In spite of running a successful direct selling business, the client is living from check to check.

The person you are coaching has more than $5000 in credit card debt.

Your client recognizes his impatience with his spouse or children growing more frequently.

In his book, Margin, Richard Swenson, M.D. points to four kinds of margins we must create for less stress, better health, and greater productivity:  he addresses financial, health, social and emotion margins.

A client may find real value in exploring and applying these margins to her life.  As a coach, you can ask powerful, open ended questions to allow her to create personalized action plans to set and keep margins in each or any of these areas.

What are some questions you might ask to support your clients?

What are some of the things you can do to create and keep safe margins for yourself?

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Form Team Partnerships with Action Plans

Action PlanningWell-designed action plans are an important part of working with a direct sales team. That’s really a DUH type of statement. Slippage inevitably occurs between plans and activities. Without an action plan for future business development, it’s more like tectonic plates grating than the flipping of pages in a book.

Actions plans are a great place for a leader to use their coaching skills rather than their mentoring and training skills. When I train, I help someone fill the gap between what they don’t know and what they know. When I coach, I support someone in crossing the gap between what they know and don’t do.

As a coach, there is another crucial component that occurs in the development of an action plan. When I coach someone to develop an action plan, they own it. They are invested in its success. They will fight to make it succeed. I don’t tell them the plan; I ask them the questions that will allow them to find their own answers.

While we can make action plans into a complicated activity, at their heat they are a very simple process built around three questions:

  1. What do you want to achieve? In other words, describe the goal. The more specific the description, the more clearly the target becomes.
  2. What do you need to do to get it? The actions. Without these, nothing occurs.
  3. What do you need to give up to get it? While this question may seem a little surprising, it’s a question about changing your activities in a manner that will free up the time for goal related activities. You can’t make your day longer, so something has to come out to make room for your new behaviors. What is coming out of your life?

There are obviously many more questions to raise. Starting with these three as your coaching framework will set your team in the right direction and your partnership will be appreciated.

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