Posts Taged time-management

Weekend Love, October Seventeenth

A group of people in the shape of a collar shirt, a flash mob.

Here are some of the great nuggets that I’ve found on the web recently. This handful of links takes you to tools or insightful content. Occasionally I’ll include one from my “save” file if it fits the mood.

Who wouldn’t like to get more done when working?  Torri Myler offers some hope with 6 Tips for Developing Stellar Productivity at Work.  Psst–she also mentions some great apps to help you in your quest that include a team tool and project management tool.

I sometime wake up and discover that I’ve gone back to a bad habit.  I sign and start over working on it.  Leo Babuta recently made a similar discover about one of his habits.  He write about I’m Returning to Single-Tasking. I really like the simple and yet profound steps to solve his issue.

When we were leading a direct sales team we occasionally talked about “Dressing for Success.”  Tom Pandola has a new take on that topic.  It’s not quite what you expect.  Please read Are Your Employees Dressed for Success?

What is life coaching?  This quick video from the International Coach Federation helps explain. Click here if the video isn’t showing.

 

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Weekend Love, September Twelfth

iStock_000049591616Here are some of the great nuggets that I’ve found on the web recently. This handful of links takes you to tools or insightful content. Occasionally I’ll include one from my “save” file if it fits the mood.

We have preferred patterns of communication—particular people, topics, and tones (think gossip).  Dan Rockwell gives some quick advice on what to keep and what to discard when he writes about How to Spiral Up Not Down.

Who wouldn’t like better teamwork?  Jim Whitehurst suggests 3 Ways to Encourage Smarter Teamwork.

No matter how much you try, you can’t do it all.  Leo Babuta provides some insights about making your choices when he writes How Not To Do It All.

From the archives:  Most of the people I coach are trying to find the right way to share their products online without becoming tedious.  I like the advice from Naomi Dunford when she talks about 3 Simple Ways To Mention Your Products From Your Blog or Newsletter.

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What Defines Importance for You?

your authentic self

If a stranger were to watch you for a week, how would they know what is important in your life?

We all carry around a picture in our head of what’s important.  And if we talk about our values, materials wants and needs, beliefs and “why’s”, we can find a way to share that picture with someone.

My question is a little different.  If someone were to shadow you, what would they say?  How do you act towards what is important in your life?

One way they could probably tell is by the amount of time you spend on certain activities.  The assumption is that if it’s important, you spend more time doing it.  You know that doesn’t tell the whole story.

Your soul and spiritual life is important but as a percentage of time…not so much.

You spend most of your life at work.  Does that make it most important?

Can “quality time” replace “quantity of time” as a way to determine importance?  Does your passion matter?

I obviously don’t have the answers to these questions and yet I think they are worth pondering.  How will you SHOW people what’s important in your life?  When you find your answer, then your true self is obvious to everyone.

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The Language of Time

iStock_000069185021Kenneth Burke once said about humans that “Man is the symbol-using (symbol-making, symbol-misusing) animal.”  His statement is probably the most accurate when we talk about time and how we use it.  Here are three examples.

The opposite of life is not work.  It’s easy to get upset about a lack of work-life balance.  Unfortunately, the opposite of life is not work.  It’s death.  The opposite of work is non-work.  Really, isn’t the choice among work, recreation, spiritual, community, personal wellbeing, etc.?

Balance is not a static state.  We think about have work-life balance as if it were a set of weights and measures.  Take some time from this side of the scale and put it on the other and then you’ve got balance.  Unfortunately, time does not stand still.  After all, time keeps moving on.  The minute after you think you’ve achieved a state of balance, you lose it.

We don’t control time.  Time continues to do what it does despite our best efforts to manage it.  When we give up the futile effort to manage time and switch our focus to managing what we do with our time, then powerful shifts happen.

If we are really listening to Kenneth Burke, when we change our language we change our possibilities.  For example:

  • Pay attention to what you are doing. You can be so into the flow that time concerns go away.
  • Think about time as flowing. What does balance mean to you now?
  • Take a long-term perspective. How’s your balance over the course of a month?  A year?

Changing our language is not an easy task.  We’ve spent a lifetime creating these images and relationships in our heads.  How will you start to be less concerned with balance?

 

 

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Weekend Love, August Twenty-Ninth

iStock_000065250231Here are some of the great nuggets that I’ve found on the web recently. This handful of links takes you to tools or insightful content. Occasionally I’ll include one from my “save” file if it fits the mood.

I spoke with the Plano, Texas Chamber of Commerce this last week about time management.  I’m not sure there is a more fitting topic for a coach to address.

I always start from the perspective that there isn’t enough time for everything, but there is enough time for the important things. Here are three of the articles that helped shape my thinking.

How do you compare earning money to other options?  Frank Sonnenberg askes eight questions to get to the answer.  His questions can be found in the article, 8 Reasons Why Money’s Not Worth What You Think.

Grace Bluerock has worked in hospice care for the last six years.  Here are Five Life Lessons I Learned from the Dying.

Did you know the phrase “work-life balance” didn’t show up until the mid-80’s.  Before that it was “work-leisure balance.” The difference shifts your thinking a bit, doesn’t it?  Read more from Eric Devaney in Should You Strive for Work/Life Balance? The History of the Personal & Professional Divide.

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Four Tiny Habits for Successful People

tiny habitsOne of the old clichés that we’ve all heard is that “The devil is in the details.”  That is really true when it comes to the habits of successful people.  You might think the differences between successful and unsuccessful people have to do with large chunks of their lives.  On the contrary, success is generated from little things that are built into habits.  Here are four of the important ones.

Successful people plan.  Successful people might not have a to-do list, but you can bet on them creating a top priorities list before they go to bed or very soon after they get up.  Setting goals and accomplishing tasks is a daily activity.  While they may have several items to “work on” they will have 2-3 top prorities to accomplish every day.

Successful people focus. They don’t multitask.  If anything, the opposite is true.  They compartmentalize.  Work is on one thing at a time.  There is a focus on the task-at-hand.

Success people read.  Reading is a habit that forces you to step away from doing and become mental (in a good way).  Reading gives you new ideas and connects old ones in new permutations.  Listen to someone you consider successful on YouTube or live.  You will hear several references to what they are reading or have recently read.

Successful people spend time away from work.  They unplug.  No one on their death bed says, “I wish I had spent that free weekend at the office.”  Successful people know that.  They spend time with loved ones in leisure activities.  When work is demanding, leisure may come in small bites, but it is there.

Think about two of the most successful people that you know well.  What are the little things that they do often?  Spend a little time making a list that can become delightful details for success.

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The Myth of Multitasking

Multitasking phonecallsWith the summer rush coming on, we all have a tendency to look for shortcuts.  You want to be outside as much as your neighbors and all of the children you see walking past.  One shortcut you might end up trying is to multitask.  While you may think that multitasking will help you get more done, that’s a myth.

Unconsciously, you can multitask.  That’s why you can walk and chew gum at the same time.  BUT if you try and think about doing both, you’ll fall down.  Consciously, you don’t do two things at once.  Your mind flips back and forth between the two.  A recent University of London study found that IQ drops by about 15 points when you try to email or text while performing other activities.

Imagine what you take away from those important meetings!  The solution is pretty simple:  Stop multitasking.  The video provides a couple of specific ideas.

Click here if the video isn’t showing.

Whatever you do, don’t drive and try to read your email or texts at the same time.  Besides being illegal in most locations, the loss of IQ may be deadly.

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Creating Your Summer Game Plan

Coaching summer plansIs it too early to be thinking about summer plans on tax day?  I had a coaching call this week with an entrepreneur and that’s what she wanted to discuss. For her, June was a major month for convention, travel, vacation, and kid-out-of-school-time and she wanted to be prepared.   I had my AHA before the call was done:  If you are an entrepreneur, it’s not too soon!  While we usually think about an intensive work time before and after a summer break, the entrepreneur has more to do than just the immediate tasks.

Whether you are in direct sales or some other business, as an entrepreneur your planning needs to go beyond a two-or three week period.  Think about direct selling, for example.  The people who join your team now will really be hitting their sales stride around late June.  The work you do in the summer will set the stage for your fall selling season.  Since you are in business for yourself, you need to constantly engage in high level planning.

During our coaching call, six core questions absorbed most of our time.  I wanted to share them with you as you start thinking about your summer.

  1. How up to date is your calendar? She was like most of us.  Her schedule was very complete for April, mainly complete for May and June, and then sketchy after that.  While June was her key month, she came to the realization she needed to be thinking about work for post-June.
  2. What business goals do you want to accomplish this summer? She had a clear vision.  Many of her summer goals center on building business relationships through follow-up from the conventions.
  3. What are the most important things you need to do now to prepare for June? This turned out to be a very important question. As she talked through the answer, her accomplishments in the next two weeks will make a lot of difference.
  4. What do your stakeholders need to know? While she thought a lot about his business, she hadn’t gotten to thinking about what her clients expectations are going from now to the end of June.  This will be the topic of several conversations between her and her clients before the summer.
  5. What do your contractors need to know? Like the previous question, she hadn’t talked with her support team and needed to bring them into the loop on her plans and work requirements for the next few months.
  6. What do you need to do to fill your fall pipeline? She realized that with a time lag of 90-120 days from starting the sales process to her first payment, her October-November business depends on starting in July. This is a new awareness and shifts her July business focus a bit.

How about you?  Are you thinking at a high level about your summer and fall business?  If you were, how will things change?

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Weekend Love, February Fourteenth

Link loveHere are some of the great nuggets that I’ve found on the web recently.  Most will be a handful of links to tools or great content.  Occasionally I’ll include one from my “save” file that hits my mood.

Happy Valentine’s Day!  Nothing says “Be My Valentine” like cooking for someone.  Here are some awesome recipes from How Sweet It Is.  I recommend the Chocolate Strawberry Crisp.

The FiveThirtyEight blog does an amazing job of humanizing data on everything from sports to illegal immigrants.  Read on to discover what it really means to say 38 Percent Of Women Earn More Than Their Husbands.  It’s a short article with a six-minute audio.

Jeff Goins, who authors one of the top blogs for writers, released a free eBook this week.  The book is an anthology with top thought leaders ranging from Seth Godin to Michael Hyatt.  I encourage you to download your copy of The Surprises of Success: 15 Tips on Living the Life You’ve Always Dreamed Of.

If you don’t have a morning routine, Mark Sisson makes a great case for Why You Should Have A Morning Routine.  If you prefer to listen rather than read, scroll to the end for the audio link.

I love listening to well delivered stories.  I don’t think I’m alone.  Here is a playlist of nine Ted Talks called Spoken-word Fireworks.

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Weekend Love, January Thirty One

Link loveHere are some of the great nuggets that I’ve found on the web recently.  Most will be a handful of links to tools or great content.  Occasionally I’ll include one from my “save” file that hits my mood.

I realize this isn’t about coaching, but we reach many people in direct sales so I wanted to share this SlideShare presentation. People in sales have a bad rap.  Here’s a defense against 13 of the worst charges.

This last week I posted an article about working with clients to change their coaching medium to create some new insights.  Then I found this article from Michael Hyatt on the differences between hand writing and typing notes.

Rare is the person who doesn’t have to be in charge of a meeting.  Even rarer is the person who doesn’t have some problem or another with it.  Dan McCarthy shares 12 key ideas for Planning Great Off-Site Meetings.

From the archives:  I first saw this YouTube video about a year ago.  It shows your time in jellybeans.  Honest.  Give yourself three minutes of fun and learn some things about a lifetime of time use

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