Posts Taged passion

Weekend Love, October Thirty-First

We share everything, even Halloween treats

We share everything, even Halloween treats

Here are some of the great nuggets that I’ve found on the web recently. This handful of links takes you to tools or insightful content. Occasionally I’ll include one from my “save” file if it fits the mood.

Just about everyone I know is trying to find additional sales this time of year.  Karyn Greenstreet gives you some quick ideas when she writes about 5 Smart Tips to Re-engage Inactive Customers.

The problem might not be the people around you.  It might be your expectations about the people around you.  What will you do now?  Dominique Christine explores this thought in her article on What to Do When You’re Feeling Disappointed in Your Relationship.

Seth Godin is one of the most concise writers I’ve encountered.  He talks about Entitlement vs. Worthiness and asks you to think about Halloween candy.  How this man’s mind works I’ll never know.

This is from the way back machine.  From top to bottom, the choice is yours.  We don’t always recognize that until it gets spelled out for us like Frank Sonnenberg did in his article, The Choice is Yours.

Halloween wouldn’t be complete without at least one article prompted by the holiday.  This one is basically pictures, so check out 26 Hauntingly Beautiful Photos of Abandoned Homes Across America, some of which might just be haunted.

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What Defines Importance for You?

your authentic self

If a stranger were to watch you for a week, how would they know what is important in your life?

We all carry around a picture in our head of what’s important.  And if we talk about our values, materials wants and needs, beliefs and “why’s”, we can find a way to share that picture with someone.

My question is a little different.  If someone were to shadow you, what would they say?  How do you act towards what is important in your life?

One way they could probably tell is by the amount of time you spend on certain activities.  The assumption is that if it’s important, you spend more time doing it.  You know that doesn’t tell the whole story.

Your soul and spiritual life is important but as a percentage of time…not so much.

You spend most of your life at work.  Does that make it most important?

Can “quality time” replace “quantity of time” as a way to determine importance?  Does your passion matter?

I obviously don’t have the answers to these questions and yet I think they are worth pondering.  How will you SHOW people what’s important in your life?  When you find your answer, then your true self is obvious to everyone.

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Weekend Love, March Twenty-Eighth

camoflage hugHere are some of the great nuggets that I’ve found on the web recently.  Most will be a handful of links to tools or great content.  Occasionally I’ll include one from my “save” file that hits my mood.

Are you really trying hard?  Naomi Dunford wants you to really look at the playback when she writes, What if You tried Really Hard?

Read this if you’ve ever used the phrase “stay at home mom.”  Jenny Acuff writes about 2 reasons I hate the phrase “Just a Stay at Home Mom.”

When is the last time you asked about what is meaningful in life?  Marshall Goldsmith, considered one of the top thinkers in the world, talks about six things in his YouTube video.

Special for the Week:  Dewitt Jones has a mission to “Celebrate What’s Right with the World.”  As a photographer for National Geographic he has done that for years.  Here are three short (20 image) collections in pdf documents around three themes of sunrises, children, and pets.

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When Will You Cross Your Rubicon?

cross your rubiconIn 49 B.C., Julius Caesar made an irrevocable choice.  The Roman Senate ordered Caesar to either terminate his military command and return to Rome or to continue in command and give up his political aspirations.  The decision occurred on the banks of the Rubicon River:  the Senate warned Caesar that crossing the river with his army would be seen as a declaration of war.

History records Julius Caesar’s decision to cross the Rubicon and change history.  Once he made his decision and started the march to Rome, there was no going back.  He took away all of his choices.  Once he crossed the Rubicon, taking the army to Rome was his only choice.  And while he only lived five more years, his mark on history is written in indelible ink.

What would happen to your life if you decided to cross your personal Rubicon?  When you make a decision that you can’t take back, your life changes.

  • You have passion where you wavered before.
  • Your path forward become really, really clear.
  • You can articulate your purpose without hesitation or equivocation.

Your unflappable commitment is not to an action.  It’s to your vision.  When I say that I love my wife, it doesn’t mean that we won’t argue.  It means that I am committed to going beyond a squabble every single time.

My business commitment is to growing leaders and unlocking coaching moments.  That’s my course even if I don’t get it right 100% of the time.

You must do four things to cross your Rubicon.

Tell the most important people in your life.  Speak your commitment to your spouse, children, and close friends.  You don’t make irreversible decisions and then not tell people.  Make it impossible to back down.

Move forward.  You no longer can stand still or go in reverse.  You have to move forward.  Every day, what will you do to move forward?

Dig deeper.  We’re not talking about a hobby or something that would be nice in your spare time.  Commitment is a long-term game.  It’s about finding, refining, and fulfilling the deeper meaning in your life.  To find this type of commitment, you are becoming a lifelong learner.  You are going to grow beyond your imagination.

Surrender all doubt.  Doubt becomes a useless thought when you can’t uncommit.  Why waste the energy?

Your life changes when you cross your river.  You’ll have to find a strategy and tactics to continue moving ahead.  You’ll need to build a success team of supporters, mentors, and a coach.

When will you cross your Rubicon?

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Bring your Passion to Your Work

Passion is not a simple thingPassion is an overworked word these days. You are told to follow your passion or to find your passion or to justify quitting a job so you can discover what makes you passionate. While these are all nice thoughts, you can do better. Here is what’s wrong with all of those options.

You have more than one simple passion. You are a complex person. Every day you think 50,000 thoughts. You think about a million and a half thoughts every month! To reduce your passion to one simple thought says really ugly things about your thought processes.

Passion is not a simple word. After 39 years of marriage, I’m still passionate about my wife. Every day it crops up in lots of different ways. As a word, passion describes a whole collection of things and not a simple, singular synaptic flash.

Passions change. Think back about 10 years in your life. Your passions were different. A little over ten years ago, you were learning to live in a post 9-11 world. Then think about all of the other facts of your life that have changed. As the world changes around you, your passions will change as well.

Age changes your passions. There is an old cliché that you are a passionate democrat in your youth and a passionate republican in your old age. You change. Your understanding of the world gets tempered by your wisdom and your passions change.

There are more reasons to not follow your passions.  You can come up with even more if you want.  So if you can’t follow your passion, what should you do? How about turning the direction for your life over?  Instead of following your passion, take it with you to everything.  Work with a coach, journal, meditate, or ponder the question on Facebook.  Discover the passion that you have right here and now and then take it everywhere.  When you discover it changes, then take your new passions to new places.  Don’t use passion as an excuse to not get along with people or not work hard.  Dig deeper in your motivations.  Be passionate about understanding yourself.

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