Posts Taged international-coach-federation

Learning Coaching from a 3-Year Old

fully present

As a coach, I consciously work to stay “present” when meeting with my clients.  After all, they want my time and attention and I want to make sure that I am fully there and stay there. Like most adults, I think I am a work in progress on this.  I think there is too much going on in my life to fully commit to one person at any given time.

This past weekend, I had the opportunity to see my 3-year old grandson in action.  He is the living definition of “being present.”  Several family members and I attended a wedding in western Illinois.  My grandson was all-in on everything.

  • At a lake? Want to go swimming?
  • My uncle brought his girlfriend. Will you read to me?
  • Flight cancelled? Do we get to stay in a hotel?
  • Chicago? Let’s have deep dish pizza (He didn’t say this, but he whole-heartedly approved).

The point is that he was not concerned with being right or leaving the correct impression.  He wasn’t bothered by delayed flights or lost opportunities.  He was participating full-out.

One of the International Coaching Federation core competencies is “Coaching Presence—Ability to be fully conscious and create spontaneous relationship with the client, employing a style that is open, flexible and confident.”  They go on to describe this with phrases like dancing in the moment, going from your gut, and choosing in the moment.  That is my grandson in action.  This is also a central piece of what coaches strive to accomplish.

I think we do this when we want to have a completely open and honest dialogue with another person.  Carl Rogers describes this by saying “To be with another in this way means that for the time being you lay aside the views and values you hold for yourself in order to enter another’s world without prejudice.”

So the next time you start to get caught in your stuff, think of my grandson, the people you are with, and go dancing in the moment.

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Making Lemonade: UCU May Coaching Workshop

making lemonadeHave you ever had so many snafu’s that you feel like you got a lemon?  To make a very long story short, we’ve been working like crazy to update the website, it isn’t done, and we have to get students enrolled for the May Coaching Launch Workshop.  Dana Phillips, one of the managing partners, is climbing walls trying to contact people about May.  And if Dana’s not happy, ain’t nobody happy.

Time to make lemonade, right?  That’s easy for you to say.  You don’t have a workshop to fill.

The website looks pretty, it just isn’t completely accurate.  Please don’t go to the website for information about our next program.  It’s generally accurate, but not completely right. (When’s the last time someone told you to avoid their website?  Never!)

That’s all you need to know about the lemons.  You know that lemonade is a simple drink made of lemons and sugar.  Here is our lemonade and you get a sweet deal.

Let’s make Dana happy!  If you will contact her and talk about UCU, you get 10% off the enrollment fee.

That’s it.  We can’t give you a steak dinner or a weekend in Jamaica for talking with us.  If you are interested in learning more about coaching, this may be your best opportunity to change your life.

We are asking you to email Dana, dana@ultimatecoachuniversity.com, and have a conversation about the program.  Dana set a goal of talking to 100 interested people.  She is committed to making her goal and won’t be happy until it’s done.  As we both know, if Dana’s not happy, ain’t nobody happy.

Make Dana happy!  Talk with her about May.  She wants to talk with you about it and how it might fit into your life.

Your conversation will save you $125 off your enrollment fee.  Here are some of the details:

From May 5-7, UCU opens its door for the next cohort of coaches at its Launch Workshop.

Why should you consider coming? If any of these reasons for attending apply to you, please join us.

You want to see “coaching training” up close to see if it fits your vision. You’ve seen trainers and you’ve seen consultants, and something seems to be missing.  Maybe coaching is it.

  • You are a coach and want more formal training so you can play a bigger game.
  • You get pumped beyond belief by supporting others to play full-out.
  • You are looking for the pieces of getting your International Coach Federation credential.
  • You want to succeed. You want your team to succeed. And you know that with the right type of support you can improve your ability to inspire and hold others accountable for accomplishing significant achievements.

Let’s face it; we all have experienced coaching and have seen coaching in action.  Have you ever thought about understanding coaching without the pressure of results? That’s what the UCU Launch workshop in May offers: Three days to understand coaching.

  • Day One is about thinking like a coach.
  • Day Two is about acting like a coach.
  • Day Three is about being a coach.

When you attend the three day Launch from May 5-7 in Dallas, Texas, you receive:

  • Online DiSC profile to assess your communication style
  • Experience as a coach and as a client (your first three sessions)
  • Your UCU Resource Workbook
  • Online Time Mastery profile and self-coaching application
  • Your copy of Coaching for Performanceby Sir John Whitmore.
  • Your copy of The Power of Ted* *The Empowerment Dynamic by David Emerald.
  • New Client Welcome Forms
  • Sample Coaching Agreements
  • Small student/faculty ratio for personal attention
  • Student rates on coaching tools

Want to talk about how this might just be what you are looking for?

Email dana@ultimatecoachuniversity.com for a personal conversation about how UCU may be for you. Why not check it out and save 10% at the same time? Let’s make Dana happy!

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What Consumers Know about Coaching

Coaching consumer opinionsThe International Coach Federation recently released their 2014 ICF Global Consumer Awareness Study.  The survey was done in 16 languages and utilized responses from nearly 19,000 individuals in 25 countries.  The study is an insightful look at how coaches and consumers see “coaching” in the marketplace.  The Executive Summary has its set of conclusions (p. 29).  Here are the four most important takeaways I had.

Coaching is a global phenomenon.   The size of the study is one indication of this.  Overall, nearly 60% of consumers are aware of professional business and/or life coaching.  17% (that’s nearly 1 in 5!) have participated in a coaching relationship. And participation is growing.

Consumers understand coaching as a definable activity.  Among the 60% of the population aware of coaching, there is also an awareness that coaching is distinct from mentoring, consulting, training, and counseling. The implications of this are important.

  • Distinct content lets you be a professional coach; you are distinct from counselors, trainers, etc.
  • Your prospective clients can see a difference between real coaching from a coach and quasi-coaching from someone claiming to be a coach.
  • The profession can develop best practices.  A good example of this is the ICF creation of evaluation markers to be used by assessors in awarding credentials.

The reasons for hiring a coach are becoming clearer. Are you a coach struggling to find clients?  Find out which reason they have and then speak to it.  New coaches often struggle with finding the right reasons to give.  Instead of being creative, you now have the opportunity reach into the consumer’s awareness of coaching to find the reasons they have.  What’s the most common reason?  “Defining strengths and weaknesses within oneself” is the reason for nearly have of those seeking coaching.  “Optimize individual/team work performance” is the most frequently cited reason for participating in a coaching relationship.

The more professional coaches produce more customer satisfaction.  For coaches, this is very good news.  The statistics on this make the conclusion a no brainer.  37% of all consumers were very satisfied regardless of the credential.  However, among the customers who were very satisfied with their coaching:

  • Of those who had a coach with a credential, 49% were very satisfied.
  • Of those who had a coach without a credential, 29% were very satisfied.

A 20% difference is very telling.  Credentialed coaches meet their clients needs much better than other types of coaches.

What do you think?  When you look for a coach, what criteria show u on your radar?

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Celebrating our New Coaches: Angie Howell

Angie Howell Certificate

Angie Howell, our newest Certified Direct Selling Coach lives in Addison, Texas.

With a human resources background, Angie is passionate about coaching as a vehicle for personal growth and increased productivity.  She serves as the Director of Partner Development at J.Hilburn in Dallas.

Angie is a warm encouraging coach with exceptional empathic listening skills. Here is what she had to say about her coach training experience. “UCU has been a phenomenal opportunity for me. Not only have I grown tremendously as a Coach, I have grown in confidence and knowledge. I am more prepared to coach, train and communicate more effectively due to the information provided on the webinars and through the coaching proficiencies.”

Her mentor coach, Neil Phillips, has this to say about Angie. “Angie is living proof that when you sent your mind to something, you can achieve it.  She wanted things that were missing from her personal and professional life, she turned those wants into goals, plans, actions, and results.  And along the way, we had some laughs.” (Just look at that picture.  Who wouldn’t want to smile along?)

You can learn more about Angie on LinkedIn.

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The J. Hilburn Coaching Culture

It’s rare that I get to see our students get resounding applause for their coaching.  That occasion occurred this past week at the International Coaching Federation-North Texas Chapter Prism Awards.  This is a big deal.

J. Hilburn Prism Award recpients

(L to R) Neil Phillips, Dana Phillips, Larry Novak, Karen Bejjani, Angie Howell receive Prism Award

Two of Ultimate Coach University’s students are key performers in J. Hilburn’s coaching culture. Karen Bejjani and Angie Howell led the charge in developing a coaching culture among the sales force.  They both spend most of their workdays coaching top performers, upcoming stars, and groups of new leaders.  Karen and Angie will both tell you that coaching is energizing and they are passionate about its importance to productivity and the personal development of leaders.

J. Hilburn received a special recognition for “demonstrating a deep strategic commitment to coaching across the organization.”  Top honors went to BNSF Railroad.  The other finalists were AT & T and Frito-Lay.

THIS IS HUGE.  I can’t emphasize enough the honor they receive with this award. Here’s why this demonstrates such an incredible achievement.     

 The ICF-NT Chapter has a storied history.  The ICF got its start with the work of Texas coaches and the ICF-NT is the first chartered chapter of the world’s largest professional association for coaches.

North Texas is known for quality coaching. Big claim?  Need proof?   In 2005, the global office of the ICF adopted the concept of the Prism Award and has been recognizing organizations that have enhanced excellence and business achievement through their commitment to coaching ever since. In the 8 years that the international award has been given, North Texas companies have been honored 3 times.

The Prism Award recognizes excellence.  The North Texas Prism Award is recognition that the coaching initiatives are meeting and exceeding globally recognized standards. The award is a public acknowledgement of their efforts in creating a culture that embraces coaching. The Prism Award celebrates:

  • Effectiveness: How has the coaching initiative been effective in achieving the intended goals and purpose?
  • Impact: How has coaching improved the culture of the organization?
  • Strategic Significance: How has the initiative addressed significant issues within or for the organization?
  • ROI/ROE: What are the tangible results or the proven return on investment or return on expectations for the organization because of the coaching initiative?

If you have an opportunity, please leave a comment and congratulate J. Hilburn for their accomplishment.

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What Makes a Good Direct Selling Coach?

Find the right coachBecause coaching is not regulated in the US, just about anyone can put the word “coach” in their bio.  I see “coaching” added to all sorts of LinkedIn and website profiles.  When I ask, “where did you get your coach training?” I often here a long pause.  One poor uninformed speaker/trainer told me she got her training from the “school of life”.  She might be a good mentor, but I don’t think I would coach with her.

Coaching with an untrained coach:

  • It’s like going getting marriage counseling from someone who has been married but never trained to be a counselor.
  • It’s like getting rehab for a back injury from someone whose mom fell and went to rehab.
  • It’s like getting trained in direct sales by someone who has never been involved

It’s RISKY at best, reckless at worst.

A great coach has been trained in the skills of coaching.  A great direct selling coach will possess both the knowledge of direct selling and the skills of a coach to best serve the client. While an up line leader might be a terrific mentor, I would look for these things as I pick a coach for my direct selling business.

Coach credentials:

Look for a person who has been credentialed by the International Coach Federation.  That credential means they have external validation as a coach and not just some piece of paper that says they paid $995 and spent two days getting certified.

Knowledge of direct selling:

Even though I know some terrific coaches who have no direct selling background, and they could coach you, most of them would refer you to a coach with direct selling knowledge because our industry is a complex one, definitely not like other businesses or other stay at home opportunities.  A coach with knowledge about the direct selling profession doesn’t need to get “up to speed” on the way you do business.

At the end of the day, if you have the basic skills in the business and you want to take your business to the next level, a coach makes sense.  Just get one that knows how to coach, not just tell you what to do.

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As coaches, how can we support our clients in creating a high performance culture? How do we support them in making it sustainable? (Note While this article is intended for larger companies, the methods discussed here can work with direct sales team or start-ups.)

Develop a coaching cultureAs coaches, how can we support our clients in creating a high performance culture?  How do we support them in making it sustainable?  (Note While this article is intended for larger companies, the methods discussed here can work with direct sales team or start-ups.)

Executives who benefit from coaching want make coaching sustainable across the company.  One common solution is to hire more coaches and hope that when enough employees have been through the process it starts to catch on and become cultural.  While that sometimes works, the results are often haphazard.  The results are not systematic.  Rather, they are person-specific.  They depend on the people who have received coaching being able to be coaches without any training, time, or encouragement.

A better approach to building a coaching culture is to treat it like any other initiative. Figure out what you want, build a program to provide it, and evaluate the results along the way. The key step is deciding WHAT you want the coaching program to accomplish so that you know how to build and evaluate it.

A good place to start looking for program goals is the International Coach Federation. Every year they host an annual competition in which the “ICF honors organizations who have demonstrated that professional coaching used as a leadership strategy can pay off greatly.” Since the applicants cover fields ranging from IBM to BC Housing Canada, the ICF has developed four selection criteria that universally work.  The four criteria are:

  • Effectiveness – How has the coaching initiative been effective in achieving the intended goals and purpose?
  • Impact – How has coaching improved the culture of the organization? What are the benefits?
  • Strategic Significance – How has the initiative addressed significant issues within or for the organization? (Examples include retention, employee satisfaction, customer satisfaction, and team development.)
  • ROI/ROE – What are the tangible results/the proven return on investment or return on expectations for the organization as a result of the coaching initiative?

Of course, criteria like these are always easier to say than develop. When you start with the goal in mind, the job does become easier.

What other criteria come to mind to evaluate a program designed to create a coaching culture?

LIKE THIS ARTICLE? Don’t forget to share it with your friends! Don’t forget to leave your comments.

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The First Step to Being a Coach

Student coaches coachingI’m sure it’s a common complaint among children that they are not treated right.  I remember protesting to my mother when I was a very young boy about “You never let me ___________ .  When are you going to treat me like a _________ .” (Fill in the blanks.  I said it a lot.)  Her answer was always the same.  “When you start acting like a ______ , I’ll start treating you like a __________ .”  That’s still great advice today.  I want to give that same advice to new coaches.  They want to know how to get started.  My answer is to act like one and the rest will follow.

You don’t need to fake being a coach.  You have some idea about what you need to do:

  • Ask curious questions
  • Ask open-ended questions
  • Let the client control the outcomes.
  • Listen with your whole heart
  • Ask about accountability for actions.

Nobody says that you have to do these activities well.  Just do them.  Put your heart into acting like a coach and then you will be one.  The key word is ACT.  ACT is the root word of ACTION.  DO something and the rest will follow.

I don’t just make this stuff up.  No matter how much you study coaching, train on coaching, write about coaching, or claim to be a coach, you are NOT a coach unless you actually coach.  The verb COACH is part of being a noun COACH.

The International Coach Federation has worldwide standards for the certification process.  To be an ICF Certified Coach, you must experience coaching.  The minimum amount of experience required is 100 hours.  To be a Master Coach requires 2,500 hours of documented experience.  For the ICF, learning requires doing.

The biggest challenge you face is the first step; the first little bit of acting like a coach. At Ultimate Coach University, we work to make that a positive experience from the very beginning.  You get to experience coaching at our three-day launch program.  As part of the process, you get immediate feedback from your client and from the faculty who are cheering you along.  By the time you leave your coaching launch workshop, you will have already started acting like a coach.

Are you interested in learning more about launching your coaching practice or building your company’s coaching culture?  We have Launch Workshops in Salt Lake City in March and Dallas in May.  You can read about what you get during the launch at the website or by sending an email to dana@ultimatecoachuniversity.  We’d love to unlock your coach.

 

 

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Get a Coach: The First Key to Starting Your Coaching Culture

First steps to a coaching cultureFor a decade or more, coaching has almost been seen as a perk of the executive position in large corporations.  In the past few years, interesting is growing in developing coaching as a method of interaction and development at virtually all company levels in all sizes of companies.  More and more, businesses are working to build coaching into the DNA of their culture.  The initial steps don’t have to cost you an arm and a leg, but you do have to make a commitment.  While most philosophers will tell you that the first step is the most important one, the step you choose need to be the right one.  Here is one informed suggestion.

Get a Coach.  When I say, “get a coach,” I mean get a credentialed coach or one who received their coach training through an accredited program.  You want someone who has the knowledge to interact well with you in a coaching encounter.  You want a coach who has been trained by professionals.   At a recent leadership training program, Betty (the name is to protect the innocent) approached me to have a conversation around coaching.  She said, “I tried coaching once, and it didn’t
work.”  As we continued the discussion, it became very apparent to both of us what went wrong.  Betty’s friend persuaded her to start coaching with a friend of a friend who was just beginning their coaching business.  This coach had no professional training other than “he had been to several weekend retreats where they taught coaching.”  Furthermore, he started his coaching career because a lot of “people at his old job told him that he would be good at it.”  While a step of this kind can be successful, it is more often the wrong one.

As with any buying decision, don’t take it lightly.

  • Google a phrase like “find a coach” or “hire a coach.”  Then research it like you would buying a car.
  • Go to a website of a professional organization like the International Coach Federation.  Most of them will let you search for coaches with credentials.
  • Talk to the coach before you hire.  Go with your gut.  How does this coach make you feel?

Start your coaching culture by working with a coach.  You’ll learn from the inside of the experience how it works; what you feel, think and do.  By experiencing coaching, you know how to grow the culture that fits your company.

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The Science vs. The Art of Coaching

Art and science of coachingI’ve been working with another coach recently to enrich the student experience at Ultimate Coach University. The program has two major goals for every student: (1) provide students with exposure to the collective body of knowledge around coaching and (2) provide student with the opportunity to apply that knowledge to their own coaching practice.  The alignment of these two goals provides the student with an incredibly powerful learning opportunity.  The former provides a chance to see the science of coaching and the latter provides insights into the art of coaching.   If the emphasis between the two is lopsided, then you won’t be well prepared as a coach.  The sense of balance between the art and science of coaching will let you be part of a great program or an average one.

  • The science of coaching is concerned with tools and replication.
  • The art of coaching is concerned with finding the meaning in the moment
  • Science is about finding significance and understanding the probabilities.
  • Art is about giving significance and unlimited possibilities.
  • Science lets you appreciate the chaos that you don’t understand.
  • Art lets you appreciate the regularity and predictability in nature.

A good training program tries to find that balance between art and science that lets you appreciate replication and rules while at the same time encourages you to own your coaching art.  Besides the recent work at UCU, we’ve also had some opportunities to work on the development of leadership training programs with several companies.  It’s a difficult balance to find.  When you spend money, you want to be able to point to widespread replicable results; those things that you can say prove a solid return on your investment. But if you don’t leave space for the art of leadership, you only have half a program.   An IQ based education without an EQ component leaves you unable to work with others.  And the reverse also is true; an EQ based education without an IQ component lacks substance.

We can learn science, but must experience art.  The best education gives a good blend of both.

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