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Jennifer Steele: New Direct Sales Certified Coach

Jennifer SteeleBy Dana Phillips

Meet Jennifer Steele, Certified Direct Selling Coach, from Richmond, Indiana.

Jennifer is a conscientious and purposeful woman.  She is a wife and mom with a busy lifestyle. She runs a successful Avon business and is building her own coaching practice, Steele Success.

At the recommendation of a friend, Jennifer enrolled in UCU in September, 2015. She immersed herself in the direct selling certification program and completed it in less than eight months.    One of her greatest insights occurred during the three day live training program. “I really learned the difference from coaching and training. From that point on, I really worked to put the pieces together.”

Neil Phillips, Jennifer’s mentor coach praises her growth as a coach.  “Jennifer worked very hard to hone her coaching skills.  She completed her course work with keen focus, took extra hours outside her major, and showed great progress as a coach.” Her goal is to continue to pursue a professional credential with the International Coach Federation.

You can find out more about Jennifer’s business at www.steelesuccess.net.

Ultimate Coach University is an ICF Accredited Coach Training Program.  It is the only accredited program offering training in direct sales coaching.

 

 

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Four Tiny Habits for Successful People

tiny habitsOne of the old clichés that we’ve all heard is that “The devil is in the details.”  That is really true when it comes to the habits of successful people.  You might think the differences between successful and unsuccessful people have to do with large chunks of their lives.  On the contrary, success is generated from little things that are built into habits.  Here are four of the important ones.

Successful people plan.  Successful people might not have a to-do list, but you can bet on them creating a top priorities list before they go to bed or very soon after they get up.  Setting goals and accomplishing tasks is a daily activity.  While they may have several items to “work on” they will have 2-3 top prorities to accomplish every day.

Successful people focus. They don’t multitask.  If anything, the opposite is true.  They compartmentalize.  Work is on one thing at a time.  There is a focus on the task-at-hand.

Success people read.  Reading is a habit that forces you to step away from doing and become mental (in a good way).  Reading gives you new ideas and connects old ones in new permutations.  Listen to someone you consider successful on YouTube or live.  You will hear several references to what they are reading or have recently read.

Successful people spend time away from work.  They unplug.  No one on their death bed says, “I wish I had spent that free weekend at the office.”  Successful people know that.  They spend time with loved ones in leisure activities.  When work is demanding, leisure may come in small bites, but it is there.

Think about two of the most successful people that you know well.  What are the little things that they do often?  Spend a little time making a list that can become delightful details for success.

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Weekend Love, July Twenty-Fifth

employee complaintsHere are some of the great nuggets that I’ve found on the web recently. This handful of links takes you to tools or insightful content. Occasionally I’ll include one from my “save” file if it fits the mood.

If you want to find out what others think about you, then you’ll have to find a way to ask them.  Lou Solomon reports on a Harris poll about The Top Complaints from Employees About Their Leaders.  Most of them even fit direct sellers and other entrepreneurs using independent contractors.

Want to know the best way to not look dumb?  Ask Questions.  Dan Rockwell gives you some great examples and he explores the topic, What If You’re Not That Smart?

When’s the last time you did a simple SWOT analysis of your business.  As you prepare to move into the Fall season, maybe you should think about one.  Dan McCarty gives you the basics in his article, How to Conduct a SWOT Analysis.

I absolutely hate text messages.  It’s great to find out I’m not alone.  Michael Hyatt agree when he writes about 3 Reasons I Hate Text Messages.

For the next couple of weeks I’ll be on a wilderness retreat that is completely off the digital grid.  Some might say I’ve simply gone fishin.’  In any case, I’ll  catch up with you the week of August 11.

 

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Want to Add Coaching to Your Skill Set?

The next three-day intensive coaching launch is September 15-17, 2015 in Grapevine, Texas near the DFW Airport.

The easiest way to know what happens is to listen to three of our student describe the three days.

Whether your interest is in adding coaching skills to your leadership, taking your life in a new direction, or becoming a professional coach, this three-day dive into key topics will get you started as a coach. You’ll leave prepared to start coaching immediately.

This program is geared for coaches beginning their professional career and for those simply wanting to add coaching skills to their toolkit. Experienced coaches participate to refresh their knowledge base and to hone their skills. The program is approved for 16 hours of Continuing Coach Education Units (CCEU’s) with the International Coach Federation.

The program provides coaches with knowledge, skills, practice, and feedback on their coaching. The course will address specifics for running programs in person and virtually.

Participants leave the program with tools, resources, skills and practice in coaching, including:

  • An understanding of what coaching is, similarities and differences with counseling, training, mentoring, and facilitation
  • Core skills and competencies for masterful group coaching
  • Foundational principles: Learning styles, listening, asking curious powerful questions, and feedback
  • Creating Connection, Trust and Accountability
  • Exercises, Tools and Resources for Coaching
  • Working with, and engaging, different learning styles
  • Navigating Tricky Issues
  • Practice and feedback on your skills

The program includes:

  • 16 hours of training ( 15 Core Competency CCEU’s)
  • Online DiSC profile to assess your communication style
  • Experience as a coach and as a client (your first three sessions)
  • Your UCU Resource Workbook
  • Online Time Mastery profile and self-coaching application
  • Your copy of Coaching for Performance by Sir John Whitmore.
  • Your copy of The Power of TED* *The Empowerment Dynamic by David Emerald
  • New Client Welcome Forms
  • Sample Coaching Agreements
  • Small student/faculty ratio for personal attention
  • Student rates on coaching tools
  • An opportunity for you to get hands-on practice and feedback on your coaching skills

Venue: The host hotel is the SpringHill Suites, Dallas DFW Airport North/Grapevine, 2240 W. Grapevine Mills Circle Grapevine, TX 76051.  You can use this link to receive our special rate of $119 per night.

Space limited to 15 coaches.

Cost: $1250 (payable in four installments). Register with one or more colleagues and save 10% each.

Here’s what past participants have said about the program:

“This is the place to learn the skills needed for coaching.” – Diane Dieffenbach

“Completely changed my mindset on the way I view people and life.  I am a better person now.” – Megan Salmon

“DO IT!  Sooner than later ” – Darla Oehlman

“A must to take.” – Diane Engle

For more details on-line, look for the Ultimate Coach University program descriptions. We are the only ICF ACSTH program that has an emphasis in direct selling.

Contact Dana Phillips, dana@ultimatecoachuniversity.com, with questions.

Looking forward to having you join us!

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The Art of Coaching

What is happiness questionHow do you explain passion?  How do you know with every core of your being that something is perfect or impossible?  The answer lies in what Michael Polanyi calls “The Tacit Dimension.”  Tacit knowledge is what we know that we would struggle to say.

Think about young Tim, a teenager just coming to grip with the concept of “love.” I can picture this 13-year-old boy coming to his father and saying, “I really love Betty.”  Dad, after calming down, would ask “What makes you think you’re in love?”  Tim has some ideas, but can’t come close to telling the whole story.

Tim’s problem is the one we all have.  We know more than we can say.  This is why we can recognize a face but not describe it.  It’s those hunches that gamblers play.  It’s those brass rings that let us say things we don’t even remember knowing but they fit the conversation perfectly.

Coaches get a lot of business because of this fundamental human characteristic.  Good coaches ask question to let you say what you know.  Great coaches ask questions to support you in digging deeper into what you know but haven’t said.

Michael Polyani, a scientific theorist, refers to this aspect of human knowledge as “the tacit dimension.”  We know more than we can tell.  And the more we tell, the more we know exists behind those statements.

Interestingly, we can’t get at our tacit knowledge by being told.  We only recognize that deeper knowledge when asked about it.

That’s why coaches matter.  They can ask the questions.  They are curious.  They take what you say and ask for what’s behind it.  Coaches have great metaphors to describe this:

  • Peeling back the layers
  • Unpacking this box
  • Digging deeper

The ability to do this well is not an easy skill.  It takes thought and training.  Learning the science of coaching helps, but understanding the right question at the right time is really about the art of coaching.  (And even great coaches can’t tell you everything about how they do it.)  How can you learn:

Engage with a mentor coach.  Your mentor can help you take apart a coaching sequence so you push your understanding deeper.

Practice mindfulness.  Think more about your second question than your first.  Take time to ask a question that pushes into the tacit dimension.

Get training.  Coach training gives you the opportunity to appreciate the art of coaching.  Investigate possible coach training programs and find one that seems to resonate with you.  Your tacit knowledge will help you find the right one if you listen to it.

 

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Weekend Love, July Eleventh

Breaking through the barrier of personal limitationsHere are some of the great nuggets that I’ve found on the web recently. This handful of links takes you to tools or insightful content. Occasionally I’ll include one from my “save” file if it fits the mood.

Feel guilty saying, “no?”  Frank Sonnenberg helps you understand the trade-offs you are creating when you say, “yes” in his article, Say Yes to No.

When I first started to understand strengths, I realized that others couldn’t do what I see as natural and vice-versa.  Dan Rockwell peels back one more layer of insight into this perspective when he writes about The Power of Awkward.

Jane C. Woods has a singular focus—women thriving at work.  As she writes, “Women duet, men duel.”  She shares more of her very credible insights when she writes about How to Talk to the Opposite Sex!

Who doesn’t love Seth Godin?  Normally his daily blog is one of the quickest reads available.  Sometimes it’s not.  Reading Seth Godin is always worth your time, especially when he writes about The tragedy of small expectations (and the trap of false dreams).

From the archives:  Executive coach, Ed Batista, who also teaches at Stanford, has a one-hour webinar on Making Feedback less Stressful.  He also answers numerous questions.  If you put it with his article Make Feedback Less Stressful, I think you have at your fingertips just about everything you need to know of feedback.  Now to just do this stuff in the key moments.

 

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Free Will

Viktor Frankl, Free Will

A human being is not one thing among others; things determine each other, but man is ultimately self-determining.  What he becomes—within the limits of endowment and environment—he has made out of himself.

~Viktor Frankl

Everything can be taken from a man but one thing: the last of human freedoms – to choose one’s attitude in any given set of circumstances, to choose one’s own way.

~Viktor Frankl

Between stimulus and response there is a space. In that space is our power to choose our response. In our response lies our growth and our freedom.

~Viktor Frankl

Viktor Frankl was not an American.  He was a survivor of the holocaust.  His book, Man’s Search for Meaning, is considered by the Library of Congress as one of the ten most influential books in America.  He understood independence and freedom.

When we talk about “unalienable rights” we are speaking of our right to choose.

Whether high born or low we have this right.

Regardless of color or sex or creed, we have this right.

We may not be able to choose our circumstances, but we can choose how we will react to them.

Happy Independence Day!

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Weekend Love, June Twenty-Seventh

iStock_000001746407Here are some of the great nuggets that I’ve found on the web recently. This handful of links takes you to tools or insightful content. Occasionally I’ll include one from my “save” file if it fits the mood.

Here’s an interesting survey result from Gallup:  89% of employers believe that workers leave their company for more money. However, as it turns out, only a mere 12% of people actually do leave for that reason.  Carly Sec provides some key insights on employee motivation in 3 Simple Ways to Inspire Employee Motivation [Infographic].

As a coach, it’s sometimes difficult for people to understand what I do.  Their thoughts range from mentoring to therapy and it’s hard to convince them that these are not coaching.  Madeline Blanchard weighs in on this topic in her short article, What Coaching Really Is.

I go on my annual fishing trip in a month.  Michael Hyatt thinks I need to do more.  Who am I to disagree?  Read 9 Reasons You Need More Fishing In Your Life.

Before you take your summer vacation, you might want to spend an hour following Karyn Greenstreet’s advice on 7 Steps to Create Your Autumn Marketing Plan This Summer.

Just for grins:  Scientists aren’t quite sure why, but Laughing Helps You Learn, Babies (and Scientists) Say.  Can I at least get a smile over the opening line?

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Weekend Love, June Twentieth

DiSC MapHere are some of the great nuggets that I’ve found on the web recently. This handful of links takes you to tools or insightful content. Occasionally I’ll include one from my “save” file if it fits the mood.

Ever wonder how to sell to different DiSC styles?  Leslie Ye of Hubspot Marketing provides some core insights when she writes about How to Sell to 4 Different Personality Types.

If you are ever in a position where you have to rationalize a summer vacation, Fiona Moriarty provides you with five solid ideas when she writes about Five Reasons Why Smart Leaders Take Vacation.

For me, Naomi Dunford produces incredible insights when she writes.  This article about the difference between truth and the PR truths we tell ourselves is tough to ignore.  Understanding this may be The Greatest Leap Your Business Will Ever Take.

Not too long ago I wrote a blog about what you might say in a commencement address to a younger you.  Tiffany Sauder had a similar idea when she wrote Advice to My 24-Year-Old Self: 8 Career Lessons I Learned the Hard Way.  It’s solid advice.  In fact, it still fits me.

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The Myth of Multitasking

Multitasking phonecallsWith the summer rush coming on, we all have a tendency to look for shortcuts.  You want to be outside as much as your neighbors and all of the children you see walking past.  One shortcut you might end up trying is to multitask.  While you may think that multitasking will help you get more done, that’s a myth.

Unconsciously, you can multitask.  That’s why you can walk and chew gum at the same time.  BUT if you try and think about doing both, you’ll fall down.  Consciously, you don’t do two things at once.  Your mind flips back and forth between the two.  A recent University of London study found that IQ drops by about 15 points when you try to email or text while performing other activities.

Imagine what you take away from those important meetings!  The solution is pretty simple:  Stop multitasking.  The video provides a couple of specific ideas.

Click here if the video isn’t showing.

Whatever you do, don’t drive and try to read your email or texts at the same time.  Besides being illegal in most locations, the loss of IQ may be deadly.

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